Peterloo – A Radical Reading (via the Radical Echo)

On Sunday 14 April 2019, several of the Pendle Radicals Research Team attended a fundraising event for the Working Class Movement Library at Salford University.  The team have been regular visitors to WCML since the project started for talks and seminars, but also to research their archives, it has been an invaluable resource for us and we were glad to have the opportunity to support it.  (Personally, I’ll also never need much persuading to go to anything that Maxine Peake is involved in!)

Read more of Melanie’s reflections on this moving event to share the story of Peterloo, on The Radical Echo blog…

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The Battle of Heptonstall (via the Radical Echo)

Nick Burton, a member of the Pendle Radicals volunteer research team, tells us about a Radical experience for the volunteers in Heptonstall…

On Saturday 2nd March, a group of Pendle Radicals volunteers ventured out on a stormy night over the border to Pennine Yorkshire. It was as if the weather was stage managed, since the evening was to be spent watching a play where there was an actual storm brewing. This was a political and human storm in the shape of the English Civil War. Huddled in an atmospherically lit, draughty hilltop church we were treated to a dramatic retelling of The Battle of Heptonstall, an event that tore the West Riding village asunder in the autumn of 1643.

Read more about their experience on The Radical Echo blog…

For Peat’s Sake! (via SVR)

More creative investigations from our Spodden Valley Revealed artist in residence, David Chatton Barker…

To read the fascinating story of peat, visit the SVR blog.

A Banner Occasion! (via the Radical Echo)

Faye catches us up on what some of the Pendle Radicals Research Team have been up to…

One thing we’ve realised while researching some of the more politically engaged Pendle Radicals, such as women’s suffrage and workers’ rights advocate Selina Cooper, is the power of protest and the special place in that of the visual language of banners. So we’re delighted that as part of the Pendle Radicals programme, MPA is invited to produce a banner exhibition as part of Super Slow Way’s 2019 British Textiles Biennial.

Read more about the Radicals Research team’s meeting with artist Jamie Holman and his spectacular banner on the Radical Echo blog…

Healey Dell and the War Effort (via SVR)

This time we’re bringing you a fascinating look at the connection between Healey Dell and World War Two. This blog has been written by Alan Rawsterne, a research volunteer for Spodden Valley Revealed who took part in our local history research workshops at Whitworth Museum last year. Alan is also Chair of the Rooley Moor Neighbourhood Forum.

Visit the SVR blog to read this Spodden Story, and find out all about the Ministry of Supply and its valley based munitions factory…

The Famine Tower – Episode Two (via SVR)

If you enjoyed reading The Famine Tower – Episode One, the story doesn’t finish there… Our Spodden Valley Revealedartist in residence, David Chatton Barker, delves deeper in Episode Two, sharing with you the only known evidence of the building of the ‘Tower of Babel’. You’ll also find a poem and fascinating film by David that celebrates the story.

A reminder… at the end of Episode One, David told us that the only known evidence he had discovered about the building of the tower was from a booklet of newspaper cuttings collected by a Rochdale amateur antiquarian named J. L. Maxim…

Read more on the Spodden Valley Revealed blog…

The Famine Tower – Episode One (via SVR)

Aetiological monuments of hope for a future/past unknown… more from our Spodden Valley Revealed artist in residence David Chatton Barker…

…There is another much lesser-known endeavour carried out by 30 to 40 out-of-work mill operatives who carted stone to the top of Brown Wardle Hill (SD899187), which stands 1,312 ft above sea level on the South Pennine moors in Whitworth (on the other side of the valley from Rooley Moor). This massive quantity of stone was used to construct a monumental tower over several months, eventually reaching the grand height of 28ft and known by seemingly very few people as The Tower of Babel…

Read more on the fascinating history connecting Haslingden flagstone, the Lancashire Cotton Famine, the American Civil War and the construction, perhaps, of a monumental tower on Brown Wardle Hill in Famine Tower – Episode One on the SVR blog.