What Next For Public Art?

AUSTERITY OR OPPORTUNITY?

A seminar by Maggie Bolt
Wednesday 9 March 2011, 2-5 p.m

Burnley Mechanics, Manchester Road, Burnley BB11 1BH

FREE

                                                       Image: Dream by Jaume Plensa, St Helen’s

Over the past eight months the landscape for cultural activity and development has dramatically shifted. Partners and methods of delivery are changing daily, and the focus on quality environments and the need to ensure that thoughtful practice informs thoughtful places has been swept over by a surge of cost cutting, shedding of professions and a culture of austerity. But hard times shouldn’t equate with poverty of thinking – in fact it is even more important, when resources are tight, to explore the left field and embrace creativity and innovation. Maggie Bolt will be talking about the challenges she thinks public art now faces, where new partnerships might be found and what we need to do in order to equip us for this very different world.

Maggie’s talk will be followed by local case studies of public art projects across Pennine Lancashire and discussion.

This seminar is free and open to anyone, but will be of particular relevance to those working in regeneration, planning, housing market renewal, development control, community and arts services.

Maggie Bolt has over 25 years experience in the contemporary visual art field. She is a creative and strategic thinker, who has specialised in the field of public art and is widely recognised as one of the key players in this sector nationally and internationally.
 
This seminar is the last in a series organised by the Creativity Works for Regeneration Group.

The seminar is FREE, and will take place in the Tudor Room at Burnley Mechanics, Manchester Road, Burnley. Tea/coffee/biscuits provided.
To book a place, please contact Lucy Green on lucy@midpenninearts.org.uk

For further information please contact Piotr Bienkowski on piotr.bienkowski@blackburn.gov.uk

These seminars are funded by Lancashire County Council through their Public Art Allocation

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