Category Archives: Opportunities

My journey so far…

I am currently36745307_1860427927348441_5113171631178514432_n studying Art and Design at Leeds University and have joined the Mid Pennine Arts team, working as Projects Assistant in order to complete a Year in Industry.

I can’t believe I have been part of the team for over a month already, and what a great month it has been! I have already gained so many skills and a lot of confidence to take with me and I am looking forward to the next year as Projects Assistant… whether this requires me putting on my explorer hat, researching numerous radicals, working with members of the public or making events such as Burnley Canal Festival a success!

What a great team Mid Pennine Arts is to be a part of, everyone has been so welcoming and given me lots of tasks to get stuck into! I have particularly enjoyed carrying out workshops in schools and at events, being creative with young people and welcoming them into the Explorer Club!

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Another highlight has been working with community groups, designing flags for Burnley Canal Festival. In particular working at a women’s refuge, an amazing workshop was carried out here which I feel very lucky to have been a part of and a very special flag was designed…. I can’t wait to get sewing!

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Already, I have been very much inspired in terms of my own practice and how this internship may influence the main subject of my dissertation when I return to University for my final year… I am not sure I will want to leave however!

Nick and Melanie have already taught me lots about Mid Pennine Arts and the various projects that they are involved in, I hope as time continues I can bring something new to the team and take on more ambitious roles and tasks!

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My Mid Pennine Story…

Hi, I’m Katie, I’m 15 and in Year 10 at St Christopher’s CE High School. I have been doing a  work experience placement here at Mid Pennine Arts for two weeks. I didn’t know very much about the organisation before I arrived, so this is all very new to me. MPA is in the middle of compiling a digital archive, to celebrate their 50 year anniversary and I am very pleased that I have been involved in this process. Whilst looking through images, brochures, leaflets and posters I found some things that I found particularly interesting and wanted to investigate further. Throughout my time here, I have been doing just that and I would like to share some of my findings with you here on this blog.

I’ve been dancing and performing since I was three, so naturally many of the projects and events that stood out for me were about dance and theatre. I’ve tried to pick a few projects from each decade, so that you can get a sense of how MPA has developed but also because I wanted to explore the early years of the company.finished-contraptions

In the 1970’s The Mid Pennine Association for the Arts set up a travelling theatre company called TheatreMobile. The company travelled around the Mid Pennine area performing shows, plays and pantomimes in a range of venues for all different age groups. One thing that struck me about the performances was how little it cost to go and see them – I think the most scrooge-and-marleyexpensive that I found was onIMG_7365.JPGly 60p! Today you struggle to buy anything for that price and to see a performance of theduo-photo-1 same nature would be far more expensive. I decided to do some research about prices in the 70’s and I’ve discovered it cost only five pence for a pint of milk and nine pence for a loaf of bread; 20 cigarettes would only set you back 30p and you could buy a Mini for only £600! Something else I have discovered from an old newspaper article is that the early shows were done with five actors, no lights and a £50 budget, which again is quite amazing. I came across another press cutting, talking about how actors from TheatreMobile had been to visit and entertain children who had to spend Christmas in hospital; MPA is all about bringing people and communities together and I think this really shows that    the ethos has always been this way.1970s-northern-ballet-company

Also when looking through projects from the 70’s, I discovered the Northern Dance Theatre, who were the only regional ballet company. They toured around the area performing their latest ballet each season, the earliest documentation I can find of this is in September 1970. What really stood out to me was their photos and how exquisite they looked in them, and as I do ballet myself I can truly appreciate how hard they must have worked. It seems that the Mid Pennine area loved them too, because they made numerous appearances throughout the 1970’s.

I1980s-collagen the 1980’s, a dance company called the Lynx Dance Company came to visit the Mid Pennine area, they were a contemporary company, who focused heavily on getting dance into schools. I found this interesting because today there still isn’t much dance in schools and I think it’s a really important and valuable thing to have.

Accidentally, I stumbled upon an exhibition of dance photographs by a man named John Austin called ‘Out of the Limelight’. I found myself fascinated by this because John said he wanted to photograph dancers because when he takes a photo, he is looking for perfection and he thought this was true of dancers also. Everyone in the dance community strives for perfection, however small the performance and even just in rehearsals, but not many people get to see this side of it all. John’s photographs not only show the pretty costumes and outstanding performance but the blood, sweat, tears and hard-work that goes on behind the scenes to create the picture that the outside world gets to see.

When setting up the MPA50 exhibition at Radio Lancashire, I discovered an extraordin60ary and beautiful project from the 1990’s. This was the Mughal Tent or the Shamiana – groups of local women joined together to create a banner, along with lots of other groups from around the UK, and the finished banners were put together in a tent at the Victoria and Albert museum in London. The finished product is exquisite and the level of hard work and attention to detail is obvious.  In May 1996, there was a performance from the Abasindi Dancers and Drummers, they performed songs and dances 1990's collage.jpgfrom East, South and West Africa. From searching through the archive, I get the impression that the 90’s was a real decade of world culture for Mid Pennine Arts as it is the first time I can see events from around the globe and from people from different backgrounds and cultures.

In the 2000’s MPA launched its largest project to date – Panopticons. Before, I arrived at the start of this two weeks, this project was the one I knew most about, as I have visited three of them on numerous occasions but still I decided to do a bit more research on them. The project got its name from the word ‘Panopticon’ which means structure, space or device providing a comprehensive or panoramic view, all of the four Panopticons are placed high up, and the aim was to get people out into the countryside so that they could see the stunning views. Throughout the building of these, MPA managed to keep the community spirit alive by involving local people, schools and organisations as well as creating jobs and supporting businesses. One thing that definitepanopticons-collagely shines through in all the projects is the community ethos of the company.

The Singing Ringing Tree is made from pipes of steel stacked in layers to make the shape of a tree in the wind; the wind blows across these tuned pipes to create a low, almost humming like song.

The Atom is located in historic Wycoller which can be dated back to 1000BC, the structure is constructed of Ferro-cement with a coating of metal-based paint. It can provide shelter but the circular cut outs also make great viewing spots for the surrounding scenery.

The Halo is a steel lattice structure suspended five metres above the ground on a steel tripod. It is situated above Haslingden on an old quarry and former landfill site. The Halo is lit at night and glows a dark blue colour, this makes it appear to be hovering over Lancashire and is clearly visible for miles around.

Colourfields is the only Panopticon that I have not visited, so I wanted to find out some more about this one. It is a transformation of the cannon battery that was installed for the park’s opening in 1857 to house two Russian cannons captured during the Crimean War. Colourfields was built here to incorporate this piece of history, rather than it being dismantled and lost forever. It adds new dimensions of shape, height and colour to Blackburn’s Corporation Park and has fantastic views over to Lytham, Southport and Fleetwood.

Before I arrived I was given some publications to read, one of which was about a project in 2014 called Truce. After reading about it, I was keen to find out more; Truce was all about commemorating the First World War, a topic I know quite a lot about through History and English. The project included: a performance about the Christmas Day truce from a local man’s perspective, a choir, made up of local volTruce collage.jpgunteers, who sang songs just like the soldiers did on Christmas Day, a textile piece made up of poppies made by local people and a young people’s football tournament- to commemorate the football game in No-Man’s Land. Again, this project involves all kinds of people and really brought people together to celebrate something that happened 100 years ago.

 

Completely bycopy 150.JPG chance, I found out that MPA was involved with tbest11smhe redevelopment of the Coppice in Accrington; I’ve lived in Accrington virtually all my life and never knew who and what had actually gone onOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA. There were talks and workshops in the allotments for the public and local primary school; a chance to think and put forward ideas for the further development of the area in the future and the Avenue Parade entrance to the park was completely restored by artist Michael Scheuermann along with the steps leading up to the monument at the top.practical-comp-4-5-12-007

Projects are constantly going on, sometimes right underneath our noses that we don’t know about or get involved in. I think this should be a lesson learnt to everyone that you should find out what’s happening and get involved in some fun activities and projects in your local area!

 

 

Hi there!

Alex Heaton - Intern - June 2016 - 2My name is Alex and I am in my second month as Assistant Producer Intern at Mid Pennine Arts, where I feel incredibly lucky and excited to be undertaking my placement year. I have just finished my second year of University, studying Illustration and Contemporary Art at Huddersfield, but come from the local area. This meant I already knew about Mid Pennine Arts and some of their amazing work. I wanted to join MPA because I am passionate about bringing arts to the community and I feel there is sometimes an absence of this, and MPA do a wonderful job of engaging a wide community for their work.

I am going to be helping Nick, Melanie and the other project managers with some of the projects as they advance towards their completion, which I find brilliant as I have never been involved with projects on such a large scale before. A few I have been helping out with are: Burnley Canal Festival (27 & 28 August 2016), Spodden Valley Revealed and 50 Years of Mid Pennine Arts.

I have only been at MPA for four weeks and already feel as though I am growing, both in learned skills and confidence. So far I have attended a lot of meetings, these help me gain more in-depth knowledge about the projects, how they are brought together, and how good communication is an important part of the process. This has, slowly but surely, been helping me with my confidence. I have also been minute taking, which is really useful, as it is helping me learn to write down key points when making notes, rather than writing down every part (no matter how irrelevant)!

We recently had a Spodden Valley Explorers event at Whitworth family fun day, where a few of us went down in our exploring gear and welcomed new explorers, helping them make badges and inviting them to share their stories of the area. This was to raise awareness of the Spodden Valley Revealed Project. It was great seeing both kids and adults alike join in on the fun, and wonderful how excited everyone was when the final badges came out. I have to say I got a bit too enthusiastic about the badge making myself. I feel as though badge making brings out the inner child in everyone, though some people won’t readily admit it!

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I have also been helping with the 50 Years of Mid Pennine Arts project, and have found reading through the old programmes and press cuttings really interesting, as I am scanning them in preparation for the digital archive. This sometimes proves to be quite hilarious, when any member of the team finds a particularly funny story or headline. Though we do sometimes have to drag ourselves out of the time warp, as you could get lost in them for days!

Along with the many lovely and wonderful people I have been given the opportunity to meet, I am very excited to say that this week I will be meeting the artist Lucy Birbeck, who is creating the flags for Burnley Canal Festival. I can’t wait to know a bit more about her working process, and I feel I have lots to learn from her.

Four weeks has flown by, and I can’t quite believe how much I have already learned at MPA. I always start each day with excitement when thinking about all the projects that are in progress, and I am so excited about the parts I am going to be here to see all the way through – like Burnley Canal Festival! I can’t wait to learn more from the kind and helpful team at MPA and all those I encounter while working here, and I would like to thank everyone I have met so far for being so friendly and great.

Not Lost, Just Interning!

Isobel Cecil - Assistant Producer Intern - 2016Hello! I’m Issy, Mid Pennine Arts’ new Assistant Producer Intern for the next six months. I’m very excited to be undertaking this role, and feel very lucky that I was selected.  Hopefully I can enrich MPA’s fabulous work with some of my previous experience and my enthusiasm for socially engaged arts.

I’m going to be working alongside Project Managers, as well as Nick and Melanie, developing projects and getting stuck in with MPA’s engagement work. This is an exciting time to have joined MPA as they put together the celebrations for their 50th anniversary. On my first day I arrived to see our team of dedicated volunteers shifting through some beautiful MPA event posters from the 60s/70s – one of which I was very tempted to take home and hang on the wall…

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Out with fellow Senior Explorers

I graduated from the University of Manchester last year with a degree in English Literature and American Studies. After completing my final year of uni, alongside becoming a Student Producer for the Whitworth Gallery and volunteer at Manchester International Festival, I became invigorated with a passion for widening public engagement in the Arts. I then went off to New Delhi to teach the most enthusiastic and intelligent children debating skills, art and literature. All of these past experiences meant that when I saw this internship, I jumped at it. Luckily I landed the role!

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The Very Special Meeting with Wild Rumpus

It’s the start of my third week today and already I’ve become a Senior Explorer Silly-iously Serious Cecil with the mighty Bowland Explorers; explored the old railway line through Whitworth and met lots of the lovely people who interact with MPA. Furthermore, I’ve fully thrown myself in by moving to Burnley, and managed to find a room just over 100 meters away from the office! I’m very excited to keep going and get more and more immersed in the great work MPA do.

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Exploring the Spodden Valley with Project Manager Diana and artist Steve Messam

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Scenery around Whitworth

I’ve been welcomed wonderfully and thank you very much to Super Slow Way and Lancashire County Council for supporting my post!

 

issy@midpenninearts.org.uk

 

 

Assistant Producer Internship (Paid)

In 2016 Mid Pennine Arts will celebrate our 50th anniversary, and we will mark the occasion with an exciting range of new projects. To help deliver this programme we seek a new person to join our team for a period of six months.

MPA is looking for a special individual to make a real contribution to developing and delivering this evolving portfolio.  We are offering a new role, as Assistant Producer, working alongside one or more experienced project managers.  Our Project Managers have a lot of creative freedom in how they develop projects, and this will apply also to our new team member.

We are looking for a young graduate (or someone with equivalent work experience) keen to develop a career in socially engaged arts. This will be a challenging role, but a brilliant development opportunity for the right person. You will be able to demonstrate the capacity or the potential to enrich and refresh our practice, to take responsibility for developing specific elements of extended projects and possibly even to start originating project opportunities of your own. There is some scope therefore for shaping the role and its workload to suit the skills and developmental needs of the individual appointed.

You can find out more about the wide range of our projects by visiting our website and our Vimeo and Flickr pages.

Singing Ringing Tree (c) Andy Ford

All the information and documents you need are listed below.

MPA Assistant Producer Internship – Role Descrip-Pers Spec – Dec 2015

MPA Application Form – Assist Prod Intern – Dec 2015

Only applications on our official form will be accepted, please do not send CVs.   Email your application (preferably as a PDF, although Word docs are acceptable) to:

Rachel Holden,  Business Engagement Manager, Employment Support Team – Skills, Learning and Development Team, Lancashire County Council

Rachel.Holden@lancashire.gov.uk

Deadline for applications is 12noon, Wednesday 27 January 2016.

You can also email Rachel with any queries prior to submitting your application.

This post is funded by the Lancashire Creative Employment Programme through Creative Lancashire and the Creative People & Places funded organization, Super Slow Way.

The funding requires that the post is only open to those who, at the time of applying, are aged between 18 – 24 years old and are registered as unemployed with Jobcentre plus.

There is no formal timetable for recruitment, but we aim to act without delay. If you are shortlisted, we will invite you for interview as soon as can be arranged.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Image by Lucy Green

Project Manager – Spodden Valley Revealed

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We are looking for a very special individual to join our team and work primarily on Spodden Valley Revealed but also to contribute to a dynamic team initiating and managing a busy portfolio of visual arts, creative learning and community engagement projects. We are seeking an experienced, versatile project manager, initially on a short term agreement, but with the opportunity for extension. If you have a strong track record of developing and delivering high quality, project-based work, and would like to contribute to the work of our team, we would love to hear from you.

You can find out more about the wide range of our projects by visiting our website and our Vimeo and Flickr pages.  The following project pages on our website are the most relevant:

All the information and documents you need are listed below.

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Whitworth – Aerial View

Please apply using our standard job application form to highlight your most relevant experience and your reasons for wanting to work on this project and with MPA. Only applications on our official form will be accepted, please do not send CVs.

 

Send your application (preferably as a PDF, although Word docs are acceptable) to:

melanie@midpenninearts.org.uk

Please submit your application by 9am on Wednesday 13 January 2016.

There is no formal timetable for recruitment, but we aim to act without delay. We will acknowledge all applicants. If you are shortlisted, we will invite you for interview as soon as can be arranged.

SVR – Project Manager – Job Description & Person Spec

MPA Application Form – SVR Project Manager – Dec 2015

SVR – Summary of project

SVR – Project Manager Post Information – Dec 2015

We look forward to hearing from you!

Family History Exploration: Computers and Creativity!

Starting in summer 2013 and funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, we’ve been helping the local community explore Gawthorpe Hall, through oral history, photography and the creative arts, in a project called Portraits of the Past.   We wanted to capture what the Hall means to the community that surrounds it. Focussing on the heritage of this magnificent 17th century house in Padiham, Lancashire, we looked to encourage local people to engage with its magnificent collections and learn about the fascinating stories of the people who would have lived, worked and used the Hall and its grounds.

To achieve this we’ve organised a series of events and activities and the most recent was on the 4th April, when a group of people interested in exploring their family history joined us for a day. It started with exploring Gawthorpe Hall and the history of the Shuttleworths and then they researched their own ancestry and finally explored the mysteries of creativity!

We started the day at Gawthorpe Hall where Rachael Pollitt de Duran, the Museum Manager, gave us a guided tour along with lots of information about the family that had lived there, the Kay-Shuttleworths.

Some members of the group had not been inside Gawthorpe Hall before and found the building and its history fascinating. In the Long Gallery it was hard work for everyone to obey the instruction not to touch the amazing wallpaper, thank goodness there’s a small sample to touch!

Ughtred James Kay-Shuttleworth - Caricature in Vanity Fair 1904

Ughtred James Kay-Shuttleworth – Caricature in Vanity Fair 1904

Once the tour was completed we headed down to the kitchen where the Lancashire County Council Community Heritage Team gave a presentation on how to begin tracing your own ancestors, using the Shuttleworth family as an example. Lots more was discovered about the family during the presentation, not least some of the more interesting first names. The group was particularly taken with Ughtred!

The team guided the group through the various online sources available for research as well as providing useful tips for getting the most out of searches. Everyone was very pleased to learn that the websites Ancestry and Find My Past are available to use for free through Lancashire Libraries, where you can book up to two hours computer time a day. You can find out more about the online resources available from the county here. As Fiona from the team said, “they’ve paid so you don’t have to”.

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Next everyone headed over to Padiham Town Hall, which also contains Padiham Library. We stopped for lunch, although in fact, the discussions about Gawthorpe Hall and family history continued throughout. After everyone was refreshed the group split into two.

Group One worked with the Community Heritage Team in the library’s computer suite getting to grips with researching via online resources. Group Two worked with artist Cath Ford to discover creative ways to display their family trees, photographs and mementos. Although many of the group were not experienced computer users, the thought of doing ‘art’ seemed much more frightening that using the computers! That didn’t last long though. Cath is very experienced at working with people who think they can’t be creative. It didn’t take her long to get them all experimenting with frames, craft paper, old magazines and other materials to create backdrops for some of the family history artifacts they had collected. Marriage certificates, discharge papers, medals, stamps, maps, adverts and of course photographs were added to flat and box frames to create very thoughtful and personal pieces of art. With the added bonus of being able to put on display some of these wonderful mementos. Nobody finished completely, mainly because they were leaving space for items they had at home, but they left with their frames and a bucket load of materials and ideas.

Halfway through the afternoon Group One and Two swapped over and the feedback was that each had enjoyed both activities. Cath and the Community Heritage Team made a good number of creative and computer converts!

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The final event of the Portraits of the Past project will take place at Gawthorpe Hall on April 26th between 1-4pm. Find out more on our website, but to whet your appetite…

Take a walk through the grounds with storyteller Steve Fairclough; discover the joys of letterpress printing with Print for Love of Wood; explore the strange delights of The Palace of Curiosities and meet Betsy the Victorian scullery maid!