Category Archives: Pendle Radicals

The Clarion Sunday That Wasn’t (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Last Sunday, 13 June, should have been a big day in the calendar for Clarion House.  For 125 years, on Clarion Sunday, riders from Clarion cycling clubs across the North have converged on this historic location, but this year the virus intervened.  Artist Alan Ward will be celebrating Clarion Sunday 2021 with a multimedia project for Pendle Radicals.  In the meanwhile, he marked the Clarion Sunday that wasn’t with this introductory missive to the cycling clubs, and the gift of a virtual ride to the one and only Clarion House. Read all about it; watch the ride, and find out how you can be involved next year over on our Rebel Pen Club blog.

Reclaiming A History of Pendle Punk – We’re Going To Need A Louder Record Player! (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Writer/composer/musician/fell runner Boff Whalley is one third of the creative powerhouse behind Sick of Being Normal. Back in the punk moment, he was a stalwart of Chimp Eats Banana. Boff considers how that unruly creative flowering has stayed with so many contributors through their later lives, and how punk in Pennine Lancashire has contributed to a longer story of nonconformism, independence and dissent.

History is a slippery, shape-shifting thing. I found out long after I’d left school that all the history I’d learnt had been filtered through someone’s opinion and that it could be changed to suit whoever was doing the telling. In my case, at school it came via a few dog-eared standard textbooks that, judging by the roll-call of pupils’ names listed inside the front cover, had been around for decades. It also usually came via a boring teacher who was clearly bored stiff of teaching bored kids about the boring stuff in the boring books.

Read more about how Boff and his collaborators first came together to talk about the Pendle Punk exhibition and their aim of incorporating those strange and inspiring times into ‘proper’ history, on the Pendle Radicals blog – The Rebel Pen Club.

We’re Going To Need A Bigger Songbook (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Fresh air and green space are precious commodities at present.  Our Radicals researchers want to honour the pioneers who gave working class people a chance of sharing those bounties.  Walking guide author and Pendle Radicals volunteer Nick Burton writes about T A Leonard and the collective joys of rambling and singing.

I’m a rambler, I’m a rambler, from Manchester way,

I get all my pleasure the hard moorland way,

I may be a wage slave on Monday,

But I am a free man on Sunday.

These words are the familiar chorus from Ewan McColl’s celebrated hiking song, The Manchester Rambler. It was a song written soon after and inspired by the Kinder Trespass of 1932 which has become synonymous with rambling. But what ramblers’ songs came before it? After all, rambling and singing were popular with the working classes of the industrial north in the 19th century and the two free communal pursuits went together so naturally. The story of our own Pendle Radical, Thomas Arthur Leonard, provides an interesting insight into how rambling and singing became dovetailed in perfect harmony.

Read the rest of Nick’s post on the Rebel Pen Club blog.

Talking Lancashire (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Jennifer Reid, a performer of 19thC Industrial Revolution broadside ballads and Lancashire dialect work song, tells us about the first two meetings of the Lancashire Dialect Reading Group.

In the future, some of us will be able to say, “we were there when it all began….”

To read the rest of the blog and find out how you can be involved visit the Pendle Radicals blog site by click HERE.

Photographing the Punks (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Photographer Casey Orr, whose portraits of people involved in the Pendle punk explosion of 1979-80 will be exhibited as part of  Sick of Being Normal – Pendle Punk – 40 Years  On, gives an outsider’s perspective on how the physical and emotional landscape of East Lancashire played its part…

Read the full story and find out more about the event in Casey’s blog over on the Rebel Pen Club site.