We’re Going To Need A Bigger Songbook (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Fresh air and green space are precious commodities at present.  Our Radicals researchers want to honour the pioneers who gave working class people a chance of sharing those bounties.  Walking guide author and Pendle Radicals volunteer Nick Burton writes about T A Leonard and the collective joys of rambling and singing.

I’m a rambler, I’m a rambler, from Manchester way,

I get all my pleasure the hard moorland way,

I may be a wage slave on Monday,

But I am a free man on Sunday.

These words are the familiar chorus from Ewan McColl’s celebrated hiking song, The Manchester Rambler. It was a song written soon after and inspired by the Kinder Trespass of 1932 which has become synonymous with rambling. But what ramblers’ songs came before it? After all, rambling and singing were popular with the working classes of the industrial north in the 19th century and the two free communal pursuits went together so naturally. The story of our own Pendle Radical, Thomas Arthur Leonard, provides an interesting insight into how rambling and singing became dovetailed in perfect harmony.

Read the rest of Nick’s post on the Rebel Pen Club blog.

Talking Lancashire (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Jennifer Reid, a performer of 19thC Industrial Revolution broadside ballads and Lancashire dialect work song, tells us about the first two meetings of the Lancashire Dialect Reading Group.

In the future, some of us will be able to say, “we were there when it all began….”

To read the rest of the blog and find out how you can be involved visit the Pendle Radicals blog site by click HERE.

Photographing the Punks (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Photographer Casey Orr, whose portraits of people involved in the Pendle punk explosion of 1979-80 will be exhibited as part of  Sick of Being Normal – Pendle Punk – 40 Years  On, gives an outsider’s perspective on how the physical and emotional landscape of East Lancashire played its part…

Read the full story and find out more about the event in Casey’s blog over on the Rebel Pen Club site.

Sick of Being Normal (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Boff Whalley brought the brilliantly subversive Commoners Choir to Brierfield Mill for a very special Banner Culture Sunday.  Now this erstwhile stalwart of Chimp Eats Banana and Chumbawamba joins two collaborators in a brand new project for Pendle Radicals. Together they look back to a time of creative ferment around the Pendle Hill area.  We can’t wait…

Pendle Punk 40 Years On

Three of us – myself, Sage and Casey Orr – have spent the last few months talking to various people from all over England whose lives were changed by being part of the punk community in and around the Pendle Hill / East Lancashire area in the late 1970s. We’ve set a date for an exhibition and event in Colne in early February (more details soon) and it looks like the exhibition, publication and various discussions will carry on after the opening, over in That 0282 Place in Burnley Central Library. Here’s the background to the project…

Read the full blog over on the Rebel Pen Club site.

Writing with a Mission (via the Rebel Pen Club)

Our Radicals research team have been electrified by the story of the great Ethel Carnie.  Project leader Janet Swan considers Ethel’s brief time in London, and how we are now inspired to rename the Pendle Radicals blog in her honour…

Writing with a Mission – One We Can Continue?

Thanks to Pendle Radicals, I have learnt about the amazing Ethel Carnie Holdsworth.  I have also had the opportunity to become involved in groups reading her work, and work with song writers who have taken her poems and turned them into songs. When the personal stories start to flow* as a result of this further work, it makes me feel glad that we may be continuing something that was very important to Ethel.

You will find the rest of Janet’s blog at our Rebel Pen Club blogsite.

Ethel Carnie Holdsworth